Have You Ever Tried a Health Drip? Our Health Editor Did!

Every year there’s a new craze, Banting, Keto, EMS training, skin whitening and of course IV drips.

After seeing every second post on Instagram of our ‘celebs’ and influencers with a needle in their arm, upping their fluid with IV therapy, our health editor decided to do some more research and try it out for herself.

Now, before we continue, for years, she used to go to her GP for a jet fuel drip.  Jet fuel? Sounds like something that should be put into a Boeing, not one’s arm, right? Well yes and no.  It is a saline bag with a combination of magnesium, vitamin C, Vitamin B and Glucose. And yes, she felt a rush of energy after or maybe it was the flush of swiping her card for R480, but effectively she felt like it really was just a very expensive wee.

With this in mind and much research under the belt, we headed off to one of the aesthetic clinics in Jozi and trusted that surely a drip that costs between R950 – R1 100, should at least make us look like a Kardashian for a few moments.

Why the doctors say they work

An IV infusion will balance hydration levels. This is especially great for sports people, especially endurance athletes, who often dehydrate during training and competing.

It can help with hangovers, recovering from flu and even headaches, but again all of this is usually due to a level of dehydration. And let’s face it, the best cure for a hangover is not too drink…but we don’t need that kind of negativity in our lives.

Glutathione can help with decreasing pigmentation, and that glow we all so badly want.

And IV other than oral vitamins, go directly into the system and doesn’t get broken down via the organs and gut.

Our personal experience with IV drip compared to the old faithful jet fuel was that there definitely was a tangible difference.  It is obviously more expensive, and not covered by medical aid. However, in saying that, the jet fuel seems to go through the system a lot faster than the IV drips offered at the aesthetic clinics.  Apparently, this is because jet fuel has a much higher amount of fluid than the new IV drips.  We definitely noticed an increase in energy for quite a few days after and a difference in skin condition was visible, with a rather glowy look, after the glutathione rush.

Do we recommend this? Well, it really is up to personal experience and opinion.  We did find benefit in it, and if you want something that indeed lasts a bit longer than your normal jet fuel, then head over to one of the aesthetic clinics and let them hook you up.

Trying new things are indeed part of 2019 for our Health Editor but do have realistic expectations.  You will not transform into the glowing Kardashian, that is more than likely due to a good amount of filler and Botox, and a couple of green peels…but that is a story for another day.

Be sure to read about Adele’s full experience and who the celebs are that are opting for the needle in our May/June issue.

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Adele Koolen
Adele Koolen

Health Editor

Adele Koolen studied BSc (Hons) Physiotherapy at Wits, practiced as a Physio for 15 years, and became one of the most sought-after Physios in the world sport arena. However, a hand injury in 2017 forced Adele to pursue alternative business ventures, resulting in her becoming a successful businesswoman and philanthropist. She is currently a Social Media Manager for a design company in Johannesburg, the founder of the #IAmEnoughZA campaign and the reigning Mrs SA Charity.

4 Comments
  1. I have seen the craze but haven’t tried it. Sounds like quite a treat and no doubt the body will love me for it. Maybe I will give it a try and sacrifice my monthly facial looking at the price…. it’s almost the same as a facial but benefit the body more.
    Thank you for an informative article 😘

  2. Very interesting! Something I will investigate myself! Thank you for the insight into new health options.

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